Heart-centered work grounded in cutting-edge science.

About

Tracy thomson

Welcome, I am Tracy Thomson, Counselling Psychologist, with a Masters Degree in Counselling Psychology. I am trained to provide therapeutic services to children, adolescents, and adults.

In addition to face-to-face sessions, I offer online services for adolescents and adults. I work two days a week privately at a Primary School and the balance of my time is spent at my private offices based in Hillcrest.

The therapeutic approach I adopt is tailor made for each client. It will depend on the presenting concerns, age of the client and their personality. My work is predominantly informed by psychodynamic and attachment-based therapy, using cognitive behavioural therapy techniques. I have an avid interest in neuroscience and the neurobiological influence of trauma. I am also a Brain Working Recursive Therapy (BWRT) (Level 1) practitioner.

When working with children under the age of 12 years old, I use a combination of techniques, such as non-directive therapy (Play Therapy) and more directive techniques (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy), depending on the age of the child and the difficulties they are experiencing. I am currently completing my diploma in Integrative Holistic Play Therapy, through PTUK/PTI (Play Therapy UK/Play Therapy International).

Services

Tailor-made approach for every individual. Therapy for adolescents and adults is offered online or in person. Play therapy for children is offered in person.

integrated HOLISTIC play therapy

I love doing play therapy and getting messy with my younger clients. I use sand-play, puppets, therapeutic storytelling, music, and creative mediums like paint and play-dough to enable children to express themselves. Play is the natural language of children. In play therapy, children are able to express difficult feelings and process stressful events. They learn to communicate better with others, regulate their emotions, change their behaviour, and find solutions to their problems.

Play therapy can help children who:

  • > have behavioural difficulties,
  • > experience anxiety and phobias,
  • > have suffered a loss or bereavement,
  • > have parents who are going through a separation or divorce,
  • > have witnessed or experienced trauma,
  • > are on the autistic spectrum.
  • > have suffered emotional, physical, or sexual abuse,
  • > are withdrawn and have a low mood, or
  • > have difficulties interacting with their peers.

THERAPY FOR ADOLESCENTS

(In-person & online)

THERAPY FOR ADULTS

(In-person & online)

Helping People with…

My areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

abuse

ADD / ADHD

anxiety

autism

depression

divorce

grief

life changes

parenting skills

trauma

“Children express themselves more fully and more directly through self-initiated, spontaneous play than they do verbally because they are more comfortable with play. For children to ‘play out’ their experiences and feelings is the most natural, dynamic and self-healing process in which they can engage.”

 

  1. L. Landreth, Play Therapy: The Art of the Relationship, 2nd Edition.

Resources

GRIEF IN CHILDREN

The death of a parent or sibling is one of the most traumatic and stressful events young children may experience. The information below attempts to provide some understanding and tips to help parents navigate the task of experiencing their own grief, doing their best for their grieving child/ren whilst establishing a new family life. Even if children are very young when their parent or sibling died, it is important not to underestimate their grief…

EMOTIONAL REGULATION

In these trying times, it is not unusual for children to experience big emotions. Their routine has been disrupted, they are missing school – their friends and their teacher, and the novelty of staying at home with Mom and Dad has worn off. They may become angry, sad, fearful or even have temper tantrums. When children experience big emotions, it is helpful to understand what is happening so that you can help them to regulate themselves again…

EMOTIONAL REGULATION

In these trying times, it is not unusual for children to experience big emotions. Their routine has been disrupted, they are missing school – their friends and their teacher, and the novelty of staying at home with Mom and Dad has worn off. They may become angry, sad, fearful or even have temper tantrums. When children experience big emotions, it is helpful to understand what is happening so that you can help them to regulate themselves again…